Appeals court to hear arguments on whether Meadows’ Georgia election interference charges should be moved to federal court

Hearing to move the Fulton County case to federal court in the 2020 election case at the United States District Court for … Nation ATLANTA (AP) — A panel of federal appeals court judges heard arguments on whether charges against Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows in a sprawling Georgia election case should be moved but expressed skepticism Friday that the relevant statute applies to former officials. Meadows, who was indicted alongside former President Donald Trump and 17 others on charges they schemed to illegally keep the Republican nominee in power despite losing the 2020 election, is trying to get his case out of state court. He argues that he is covered under the Federal Officer Removal Statute, which allows federal officials to move legal cases against them to federal court when they are related to their official duties. U.S. District Judge Steve Jones ruled against him in September, finding that Meadows’ actions were taken on behalf of the Trump campaign. Meadows appealed the ruling to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and a panel of three judges held oral arguments on the case Friday. Chief Circuit Judge William Pryor seemed doubtful that the removal statute applies to former officers who are no longer in their official roles. The appointee of President George W. Bush said it makes sense that Congress would write such a law for current federal officers who are still involved in running the government but the case of a former officer “doesn’t involve the ongoing operations of the government.” Circuit Judge Robin Rosenbaum, an appointee of President Barack Obama, asked prosecutor Donald Wakeford about a possible chilling effect, giving hypothetical scenarios where federal officials who do things that may not be popular as part of their official duties could change their behavior […]

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By Donato