US tensions with China are fraying long-cultivated academic ties. Will the chill hurt US interests?

1 of 2 | FILE – American flags are displayed together with Chinese flags on top of a trishaw on Sept. 16, 2018, in Beijing. Over the past four decades, U.S. universities have educated millions of Chinese students, many of whom have stayed in the country and become top researchers and distinguished professors. The number of Chinese students in the United States is down, and U.S.-Chinese research collaboration is shrinking, with academics shying away from potential China projects over fears that seemingly minor missteps could end their careers. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File) Read More 2 of 2 | FILE – Chinese students wait outside the U.S. Embassy for their visa application interviews on May 2, 2012, in Beijing. Over the past four decades, U.S. universities have educated millions of Chinese students, many of whom have stayed in the country and become top researchers and distinguished professors. (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, File) Read More WASHINGTON (AP) — In the 1980s, Fu Xiangdong was a young Chinese virology student who came to the United States to study biochemistry. More than three decades later, he had a prestigious professorship in California and was conducting promising research on Parkinson’s disease. But now Fu is doing his research at a Chinese university. His American career was derailed as U.S.-China relations unraveled, putting his collaborations with a Chinese university under scrutiny. He ended up resigning. Fu’s story mirrors the rise and fall of U.S.-China academic engagement. Beginning in 1978, such cooperation expanded for decades, largely insulated from the fluctuations in relations between the two countries . Today, it’s in decline, with Washington viewing Beijing as a strategic rival and there are growing fears about Chinese spying. The number of Chinese students in the United States is down, and U.S.-Chinese research collaboration is shrinking. Academics are […]

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