A couple of months ago, four Nigerian stowaways traveled 3,500 miles above the rudder of a cargo ship all the way from Lagos to the southeastern coast of Brazil—without knowing where they were going. The stowaways were rescued by Brazilian authorities after 14 days at sea on a harrowing journey that echoed the forced trajectory of enslaved people during the Atlantic slave trade. Without food or water, the men told the New York Times , they licked toothpaste and drank seawater to hold on to life. Two of the stowaways chose to return to Nigeria, while the other two […]

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Katherine Jensen, author.Mother Jones illustration; The University of Chicago Press Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.

A couple of months ago, four Nigerian stowaways traveled 3,500 miles above the rudder of a cargo ship all the way from Lagos to the southeastern coast of Brazil—without knowing where they were going. The stowaways were rescued by Brazilian authorities after 14 days at sea on a harrowing journey that echoed the forced trajectory of enslaved people during the Atlantic slave trade. Without food or water, the men told the New York […]

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What the United States Can Learn From Brazil About Asylum

Katherine Jensen, author.Mother Jones illustration; The University of Chicago Press Fight disinformation: Sign up for the free Mother Jones Daily newsletter and follow the news that matters.

A couple of months ago, four Nigerian stowaways traveled 3,500 miles above the rudder of a cargo ship all the way from Lagos to the southeastern coast of Brazil—without knowing where they were going. The stowaways were rescued by Brazilian authorities after 14 days at sea on a harrowing journey that echoed the forced trajectory of enslaved people during the Atlantic slave trade. Without food or water, the men told the New York […]

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